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elijah2I see that the Suburban Hermit has been silent since the middle of February.

Readers have asked, “What has happened to the Suburban Hermit? Have you closed that blog?”

The answer is that I have been very busy and have been feeling for some time that my writing is going in a different direction, but I’m not sure exactly where. Suburban Hermit was started last Fall for the same reason.

Anyway, should people be surprised that a hermit is, well, eremitical? A hermit is not supposed to be talkative you know!!

Just kidding. Sorry not more has been done here. Now over the summer things are a bit quieter, so perhaps Suburban Hermit will get back to blogging a bit

What has prompted this post it today’s Mass reading of Elijah in the cave on Mt Horeb–the mountain of the Lord. This is probably my most favorite Bible passage from the Old Testament.

At the mountain of God, Horeb,
Elijah came to a cave, where he took shelter.
But the word of the LORD came to him,
“Go outside and stand on the mountain before the LORD;
the LORD will be passing by.”
A strong and heavy wind was rending the mountains
and crushing rocks before the LORD—
but the LORD was not in the wind.
After the wind there was an earthquake—
but the LORD was not in the earthquake.
After the earthquake there was fire—
but the LORD was not in the fire.
After the fire there was a tiny whispering sound.
When he heard this,
Elijah hid his face in his cloak
and went and stood at the entrance of the cave.
A voice said to him, “Elijah, why are you here?”
He replied, “I have been most zealous for the LORD,
the God of hosts.
But the children of Israel have forsaken your covenant,
torn down your altars,
and put your prophets to the sword.
I alone am left, and they seek to take my life.”
The LORD said to him,
“Go, take the road back to the desert near Damascus.
When you arrive, you shall anoint Hazael as king of Aram.
Then you shall anoint Jehu, son of Nimshi, as king of Israel,
and Elisha, son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah,
as prophet to succeed you.”

The Cave of Elijah on Horeb

The Cave of Elijah on Horeb

What I love about this is that Horeb–the mountain of God–is also the site where God appeared to Moses in the Burning Bush and where the Ten Commandments were given. We often think of that site as Sinai, but “Sinai” is better named as the region where this mountain is, although the mountain itself is also called Sinai.

God appears at the Burning Bush to reveal that his name is I AM–he is the source of Being itself and IS Being itself. Then at Horeb in the thunder, smoke and fire the Ten Commandments are given and God shields Moses from his glory. When Elijah goes there however, God is NOT in the earthquake, wind and fire, but in the still, small voice.

There in the silence the same God who gave the Ten Commandments and revealed himself as the ground of all Being comes in a personal and intimate way in the moment of contemplation. He is there in the timeless moment out of time. He is there whispering, “Be Still and Know that I AM God.” Thus Elijah is the forerunner of all contemplative prayer. He is the Father of Eucharistic Adoration.

That’s why Elijah is the forerunner and father of the whole monastic movement. He is the inspiration for the first desert fathers who went out into the same harsh Egyptian desert to find God in the caves of glory. He is the inspiration for the Carmelite order founded on Mt Carmel. Down through the whole monastic tradition from the Eastern Fathers to Benedict, Bruno and the Carthusians, the Camaldolese and the rest, Fr Elijah is the man.

The Monastery of St Catherine, Sinai

The Monastery of St Catherine, Sinai

The holy mountain can still be visited today. At its base is the ancient monastery of St Catherine of Sinai. I went there during my great pilgrimage in 1987 when I hitchhiked from England to Jerusalem. I climbed the mountain, beginning late in the afternoon and found a cave to sleep in half way  up. The next morning I joined another group of pilgrims to climb to the top of the Holy Mountain for sunrise.

It’s a wonderful tradition which connects you even today with Moses, the burning bush, the reception of the law of God and Elijah, the cave,and  the still small, voice of love.

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